Body fat and muscle mass: Milk protein vs sugary drinks

There’s a reason why we added the most popular protein for athletes world wide to Damn Good. Here’s just another example. A studie by McMaster University comparing the effects of skimmed milk and a sugary energy drink in women after a workout. 

Body fat and muscle mass: Milk protein vs sugary drinks

The study was published in 2010. I believe a lot has changed since then concerning women’s views on resistance training. Gone are the days that woman only see the advantages of cardio. These are the days of woman appreciating deadlifts and hip thrusts for their effect on the lower body.
‘Ideal figures’ have started to change from skinny runway models to more shaped physiques. Fit girl killed the model star. Well kinda.
So when Stu Phillips professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University says that resistance training is not a typical choice of exercise for women, I say ‘times have changed’. Due in part to studies like hers showing the health benefits of resistance training.
“It boosts strength, bone, muscular and metabolic health in a way that other types of exercise cannot.”
Phillps’ lab had shown before that milk increased muscle mass and fat loss in men. This new study, says Phillips was more challenging because women not only steer clear of resistance training they also tend to steer away from dairy products based on the incorrect belief that dairy foods are fattening.
Phillips’ team expected the gains in muscle mass to be greater, but the size of the fat loss surprised them. They weren’t sure what caused this. A possible explanation could be the combination of calcium, high-quality protein, and vitamin D may be the key.

The study

The team monitored young women who did not use resistance-training exercise. Every day, two hours before exercising, the women were required not to eat or drink anything except water. Immediately after their exercise routine, one group consumed 500ml of fat free white milk; the other group consumed a similar-looking but sugar-based energy drink. The same drinks were consumed by each group one hour after exercising.
The training consisted of three types of exercise: pushing (e.g. bench press, chest fly), pulling (e.g. seated lateral pull down, abdominal exercises without weights), and leg exercises (e.g. leg press, seated two-leg hamstring curl). Training was monitored daily one on one by personal trainers to ensure proper technique.
Loosing fat, gaining muscle
“The women who drank milk gained barely any weight because what they gained in lean muscle they balanced out with a loss in fat” said Phillips. “Our data show that simple things like regular weightlifting exercise and milk consumption work to substantially improve women’s body composition and health.”
Translated to Damn Good
This study is relevant to Damn Good because of the protein content. The women had to drink 500ml of skimmed milk for 18grams of protein. There’s 15grams of protein in a 250ml can.
Milk has two types of protein, whey (20%) and casein (80%). Both have the role in building and maintaining muscle mass. Whey however is more popular among athletes because of its rapid uptake and effect on muscle synthesis.

Story Source:
Materials provided by McMaster University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
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Contact

Boekweitstraat 80,
1446 CM Purmerend,
The Netherlands

info@damngoodnutrition.com

Join us

DamnGoodNutrition © 2021 - All rights reserved
Webshop af AWORK Webbureau